April 15, 2021

Midnight North Leads CSNY Tribute At Brooklyn Bowl With Phil Lesh In Attendance [A Gallery]

first_imgMidnight North played a rocking tribute to Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young with Tom Hamilton and Scott Metzger at the Brooklyn Bowl last night. Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh was in attendance, supporting his son Grahame Lesh, who plays guitar and sings in the San Francisco-based Americana-rock band. Lesh didn’t play, but he did enjoy watching on as the band slayed the stage with their high energy and impressive takes on the classic tunes of CSNY. The Bowl was certainly treated to an exciting night, as Lesh posed for pictures with fans after the truly amazing night of music. Check out some fan-shot footage from the “Brooklyn is CSNY” event, and enjoy the full gallery below:Judy Blue Eyes Load remaining images Everybody I Love YouPhotos courtesy of Andrew Scott Blackstein:last_img read more

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Coronavirus: Survey fears house values could fall after record drop in confidence

first_imgQueensland had the least of the terrible results in the 12-month ahead capital growth expectations index for residential houses.Coronavirus has done what elections, oversupply and the mining bust could not, breaking property confidence to its lowest point since 2011 – and prices could follow, the latest Big Four Bank survey warns.If Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk needed a fresh indicator of just how badly hit the confidence of investors is in the state right now, the dire results from the ANZ/Property Council Survey – out today – would be a good place to start. Taken before and during the coronavirus emergency, Property Council Queensland executive director, Chris Mountford, said there was no other way to put it, given all sectors were impacted by the global crisis.“You cannot sugar-coat the level of concern out there in the property industry about the economic impact of the coronavirus. Across Australia we’ve recorded a significant fall in growth expectations as the entire economy braces for impact.”But he warned that if real estate and construction was to help lead the way out for the economic recovery, tax breaks would be necessary.“The industry is hoping for a quick recovery and to ensure this occurs it is critical that the pipeline of future projects continues to flow uninterrupted despite the crisis.”“Over the medium to longer term further stimulus measures will be necessary to restore confidence.” FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK “Confidence levels in Queensland fell from 119 index points in March 2020 to 58 points in June 2020 (with 100 being a neutral level of confidence). This is the largest quarterly drop in confidence since the survey began in 2011,” the survey found.“The result is also the first time that confidence levels have been below neutral since December 2012.”Among the questions the survey asked was “over the next 12 months in the state you primarily operate, how do you expect capital values to change for residential”.The results were shocking with Queensland emerging with the least of the terrible results in the 12-month ahead capital growth expectations index, notching a -20 point fall. Every other state and territory expected even worse than that. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58More from newsCOVID-19 renovation boom: How much Aussies are spending to give their houses a facelift during the pandemic3 days agoWhizzkid buys almost one property a month during COVID-197 days ago Brisbane rents tipped to fall Australia in top three for virus fightback MORE: Tenants set to gain all the powerlast_img read more

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Africa: Serious about food

first_imgA boy smiles for the camera at EvaOrango school in Orango Island of BijagoArchipelago in Guinea-Bissau.(Image: Manoocher Deghati, Irin Photo)MEDIA CONTACTS• Ousmane BadianeAfrica director for the International FoodPolicy Research Institute+1 202 862 [email protected]• Dr Andrew KanyegirireCAADP Communications Manager+27 11 256 [email protected] The record prices of staple grains in 2008 made investment in agriculture an attractive proposition for countries exporting as well as importing food. The African Union (AU), with its mix of producers and buyers, has been steadily gearing up for self-sufficiency.Shortly after Malawian president Bingu wa Mutharika became AU chair in 2010, he announced a plan to make Africa food secure in the next five years.Martin Bwalya, head of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) said the AU’s seven-year roadmap to put the spotlight on farming so as to promote food security and economic growth, and reduce poverty, was set in motion five years ago.By the end of 2010, the agriculture development plans of 18 African countries had undergone a rigorous independent technical review and were being rolled out.Over 60% of Africa’s people live in rural areas and most depend on farming for food and income. Agriculture contributes between 20% and 60% to nations’ gross domestic product.In a document called The African Food Basket, Mutharika spelt out the details of his plan, which requires countries to allocate a substantial portion of their budget to agriculture, provide farming input subsidies, and make available affordable information and communications technology.This would be possible with the help of a new strategic partnership between countries, donors, aid agencies and the private sector.CAADP, initiated in 2003, covers all the main aspects of Mutharika’s plan, including African governments’ commitment to devote at least 10% of their budgets to agriculture.Under the programme, countries draw up comprehensive investment plans that include the four CAADP pillars: sustainable land and water management, improved market access and integration, increased food supplies and reduced hunger, and research, technology generation and dissemination.“We expect the countries to contribute at least 10% of the annual expenditure budget demonstrating local ownership and responsibility,” said Bwalya.He added while development aid financing remained important, it was also crucial that countries consider measures to attract direct private sector financing to agriculture.Uganda, one of the 18 states to undergo the review process, has met about 65% of its funding requirements from its own budget.The AU’s development agency, the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad), which runs CAADP, helps countries to mobilise funds.Is achieving food self-sufficiency in five years a realistic goal? It would be a tough call, said Ousmane Badiane, director for Africa at the US-based International Food Policy Research Institute.He noted that the AU had 53 members with varying degrees of agriculture investment, development and needs, and some countries did not have the structural capacity to reach the target of food self-sufficiency for many reasons including civil conflicts.Going regionalA more realistic option, Badiane said, would be for countries with the potential to improve food production to produce enough to feed their less productive neighbours. This called for expanding regional trade and investment in transportation, including ports, railways and highways linking countries.AU members have begun to take regional economic integration “seriously”, noted Calestous Juma, professor of international development at Harvard University in his recently released book, The New Harvest.He lists regional markets as one of the three opportunities that could fortify Africa’s food security against the rising threat of climate change.There are at least eight regional economic communities, “that are recognised by the AU as building blocks for pan-African economic integration”; these include the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa, or Comesa, and the East African Community. However, “Regional cooperation in agriculture is in its infancy and major challenges lie ahead.”Regions could become food secure “by capitalising on the different growing seasons in different countries and making products available in all areas for longer periods of time”, he wrote.Both Mutharika and CAADP emphasise the development of regional markets. Mutharika listed 12 regional trade corridors identified by the various regional economic communities and suggested the AU draw up an institutional framework for each corridor.Science and technologyIn his book Juma lists advances in science and technology as another factor that could propel Africa towards food self-sufficiency, and called for more investment in the creation of regional hubs of research and innovation.Research is being carried out by groups created under Nepad, such as the Biosciences Eastern and Central Africa Network, which has been leading research on food crops, including banana, teff, cassava, sorghum and sweet potatoes. More investment in networks, especially agriculture-related ones, could produce far-reaching results.Fertiliser and subsidiesUnderuse of fertilisers has often been cited as a major cause of low production in Africa. Only four countries – Egypt, Malawi, Mauritius and South Africa – have exceeded the 50 kilograms per hectare target set by the AU, Mutharika noted in his plan.Fertiliser use in Africa accounts for less than 10% of the world average of 100 kilograms per hectare. “Just five countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Nigeria) account for about two-thirds of the fertiliser applied in Africa,” Juma said.Mutharika, who promoted the provision of subsidised fertiliser in Malawi, makes a strong case for this approach. At present 19 African countries are implementing various programmes providing fertiliser.Juma sees leaders like Mutharika, who has prioritised food security as the third factor that could set Africa on the path to food security. The Malawian government devotes 16% of its national budget to agriculture.Yet Badiane of the International Food Policy Research Institute sounded a note of caution on subsidies and cited the case of Senegal. After independence the West African country put in place an agriculture subsidy programme in the 1960s that was even more comprehensive than Malawi’s. “It had a dramatic effect on agriculture in Senegal, but by 1979 one of its [agriculture] agencies had worked up a deficit amounting to 98% of the national budget.”Carefully managed subsidies, run for a short term, and aimed at strengthening existing markets and agricultural infrastructure, were a lot more effective, he said.The Rwandan government provided free fertiliser to farmers for four years after 1994. In 1998 it wanted to hand over importing and distribution to the private sector, which unfortunately lacked capacity, so the government continued to procure and import fertiliser but left distribution and selling to the private sector.Since then, aid from financial institutions has helped the private sector build capacity to import, and at least 20 bodies now import several hundred metric tons of fertiliser, Badiane said.Way forwardThe AU’s plans for agriculture also tackle other major issues affecting food security, such as irrigation (only 4% of Africa’s crop area is irrigated, compared to 39% in South Asia); improving soil fertility (more than 3% of agricultural gross domestic product in Africa is lost annually as a direct result of soil and nutrient loss); post-harvest storage loss (sub-Saharan Africa loses about 40% of its harvest per year, against 1% in Europe); setting up databanks to share early warning information and energy.There is a high level of engagement between countries on agriculture. “They meet regularly and we support them in building evidence-based information,” CAADP’s Bwalya noted.If they stayed the course in implementing CAADP, Badiane said in five years a large number of African countries, if not food secure, would be in a much better position to feed themselves.Source: Irin Newslast_img read more

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Roque says Vicente left UE for ‘personal reasons’

first_imgJohn Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving AFP official booed out of forum It was the end of an unfruitful era for University of the East when former head coach Francis Vicente left.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ LATEST STORIEScenter_img Taking his place, in an interim basis, is the school’s athletic director Rod Roque who had his first match in the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball tournament against Far Eastern University Saturday at Filoil Flying V Centre.Roque, who won eight straight titles as head coach of the UE boys’ volleyball team, said Vicente left the Lady Warriors for “personal reasons.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Coach Francis, I know deep within him why he left,” said Roque in Filipino after their loss to the Lady Tamaraws, 25-20, 25-17, 24-26, 25-22. “He left personally, he just told us that he would be leaving due to ‘personal reasons.’”“When he said that, we didn’t even bother asking why. We respected his decision. When he said that it’s a personal reason that is what we will say to everyone. Let’s not dig into it.” Magnolia earns twice-to-beat, pulls plug on Meralco’s playoff hopes Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments Read Next LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Vicente, a multi-titled coach with University of Santo Tomas in the high school division, was UE’s head coach for four years where he compiled a record of 2-45 and those two wins were both against Adamson University.Roque added he wants the Lady Warriors, who fell to a 0-6 hole, to move on from what happened in the past and try to improve on where they are in the UAAP landscape.“I told them ‘we move on’and whatever they experienced in the past let’s just move on,” said Roque. “I won’t change anything under coach Francis’ system because it’s been there for four years.”“What I’ll do is slowly inject my own system. We’ll be correcting our mistakes in the next few days and we will try to improve.”ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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