Report Finds Mortgage Concerns Are One of the Top Financial Reasons Americans

first_imgReport Finds Mortgage Concerns Are One of the Top Financial Reasons Americans Lose Sleep More Americans are sleeping better at night knowing that the economy is recovering. Those Americans that are losing sleep over financial stress is declining in the U.S., according to a new CreditCards.com poll.The national poll, commissioned by CreditCards.com, also found that 62 percent of adult Americans are losing sleep over at least one financial problem. This is 7 percentage points lower than the amount in June 2009, the last time this poll was conducted, but higher than 56 percent in 2007.One of the top insomnia-inducing issues that worries many Americans is how they will pay their mortgage and monthly rent bills, the poll determined. Twenty-seven percent indicated that home and rent payments block sleep at night.“Many Americans are still struggling financially, even as the economy rebounds,” said Matt Schulz, senior industry analyst for CreditCards.com. “Twenty-seven percent of Americans are losing sleep over mortgage or rent payments—about the same number as in 2009, in the throes of the Great Recession when we last did the survey. And 1 in 3 Americans between the ages of 18 and 49 are losing sleep over paying their rent or mortgage.”According to the poll participants, the most common financial worry is saving enough for retirement. Two-in-five Americans noted that stress about retirement keeps them awake at night at least occasionally. The next big concern is educational expenses, which troubles young adults the most.“Ultimately, it’s about income. They say money can’t buy you love or happiness, but according to our survey, it can sure as heck buy you a better night’s sleep. Those making $75,000 or more per year were the least likely to be losing sleep, while those making less than $30,000 per year were the most likely.”CreditCards.com found that 40 percent of poll respondents are restless at night because of retirement savings. This anxiety cause the most amount of stress, especially among those adults who are approaching retirement age. Educational expenses seem to another burden among American that causes wakefulness thought the night. Approximately 31 percent of participants pointed out that they are deeply concerned with their ability to pay their own or someone else’s educational expenses.Americans are also worried about health care or insurance bills and how they will manage to pay these necessary expenditures. The poll found that 29 percent of people lose sleep over these financial stressors, a 6 percent decrease since 2009. Americans place credit card debt at the bottom of their list of worries, with 21 percent saying that this troubles them at night.”I think people are better off today than they were six years ago,” said James Chessen, chief economist with the American Bankers Association (ABA). “They are more secure in their jobs, their incomes are a little better, housing values are improving and they’ve managed their debt. There are still a lot of challenges, but overall people are in better positions than they have been since the recession.”CreditCards.com advises those Americans who are losing sleep at night due to financial woes to review their finances thoroughly, spend less, start an emergency fund, and come up with a budget.”I’m guessing someone who is really worrying does not have the basics covered,” said Edward Tonini, director of education at Alliance Credit Counseling. “For a lot of us, the unknown can really create the most anxiety. Take little steps and focus your energy on them and feel some sense of relief that at least you are making progress. It might take longer than you would like it to take, but realistically you have to work within your budget.”Click here to view the complete CreditCards.com poll. June 25, 2015 498 Views Sharecenter_img CreditCards.com Economy Financial Stress Mortgage Payment Rent Payment 2015-06-25 Staff Writer in Daily Dose, Data, Headlines, News, Uncategorizedlast_img read more

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The 5 Takeaways from the Coyotes introduction of

first_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Top Stories “I think it’s just one of those things,” Humphries said of not being ready to play just yet. “I knew I wasn’t ready, that was clear. But I feel like it’s not taking too much time as long as I’m getting better. It’s taking too much time if I’m just sitting still and I’m not getting any better.“As long as I’m getting better and I’m progressing, I feel like I’m not going to rush it all. I want to be as prepared as I can be to be ready to help this team out when I get put out on the field.” Even if the Cardinals don’t need much from Humphries this season, the fact that he is making progress is a very good sign. At some point, the team will likely need to turn to the 6-foot-5, 307-pounder, be it this year or next.“A lot of progress,” Arians said of what he’s seeing from the first-round pick. “I really like where he’s at right now, his competitive level. (Defensive end) Dwight Freeney’s helped him a little bit too, as (linebacker) Markus Golden has the whole time he’s been here. They get after it and if you don’t get after it, you’ll get embarrassed. He’s handled himself pretty well.”Goodwin said along with the physical aspect of the game, Humphries needed to learn the mental side, including what it takes to play at a consistently high level. That may not be too surprising, really, as he would not be the first rookie to have a bit of a learning curve before being a reliable, finished product.The offensive coordinator pointed to 2013 first-round pick Jonathan Cooper as a very talented player who has needed time to grow, so that Humphries may be on the same path is not necessarily a terrible thing.If nothing else, it’s just the way it is. TEMPE, Ariz. — In a lot of ways, D.J. Humphries’ rookie season has gone according to plan.Though the 24th overall selection in the 2015 NFL Draft, the hope was that with Jared Veldheer at left tackle and Bobby Massie at right tackle, the former Florida Gator would not be needed this year.He could, for all intents and purposes, sit on the sideline and learn his craft, readying himself for a future that appears to be rather promising.center_img Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires However, it’s fair to say few expected Humphries to be inactive for each of the Cardinals’ first seven games, which is exactly what he has been. Whether he was ready or not, the team was not ready for him.But Humphries, 21, is on the right track.“I just kind of gave B.A. a drive by and said, ‘Man, he’s getting better,’” offensive coordinator Harold Goodwin said. “He’s working harder. He’s starting to see what these older guys are doing, these veteran guys and just kind of doing what they do. But he is getting better.”Goodwin said Humphries has been putting in good work in the weight room, too, and that the rookie’s evolution is on display.“He’s making strides, but as we know, Rome wasn’t built in a day,” he added.Nicknamed “Knee Deep” in the offseason because he needed a little extra motivation at times, Humphries too said he feels like things are moving in the right direction.“Definitely feel like things are starting to change and come around,” he said. “I think it’s just I’m starting to get comfortable. Stuff is starting to feel more natural, muscle memory is getting down pat. Learning the speed of the game and just learning what everybody expects from me.” Comments   Share   Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

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