A rotating crop of fresh greens grows in one of th

first_imgA rotating crop of fresh greens grows in one of the greenhouses. After harvesting, the agriculture crew sells greens and other items from the garden at the farmer’s market at the Arcosanti Cafe. Fresh lettuce from the greenhouse are also available at the Cafe salad bar. [Photo & text: Yuki Y] March 2, 2005Agriculture department crew works in their new orchard next to the lake. February workshopper Ursula LeMaistre and Garden Manager Scott Dolan plant new apple trees. [Photo & text: Yuki Y] The apple orchard with the Arcosanti buildings in the background. [Photo & text: Yuki Y]Agriculture department crew works in their new orchard next to the lake. February workshopper Ursula LeMaistre and Garden Manager Scott Dolan plant new apple trees. [Photo & text: Yuki Y] A new crop of garlic grows in the garden. It will be ready to harvest in the middle of May. [Photo & text: Yuki Y] The apple orchard with the Arcosanti buildings in the background. [Photo & text: Yuki Y]last_img read more

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German cable operator Kabel Deutschland KDG has

first_imgGerman cable operator Kabel Deutschland (KDG) has issued a €300 million bond.The company will use the net proceeds of the five-year bond, set to mature in 2017, to partially replace the €600 million in bridge financing it has raised for the planned acquisition of Tele Columbus.last_img

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Stephen McKinney was remanded in custody following

first_imgStephen McKinney was remanded in custody following his appearance at Omagh Magistrates’ Court.POLICE APPEAL FOR INFORMATION OVER MURDER OF DONEGAL WOMAN LU NA MCKINNEY was last modified: December 11th, 2017 by John2John2 Tags: ShareTweet Donegal mum of two Lu Na McKinney who police say was murdered. Her husband Stephen was charged last week with murdering herDETECTIVES from the PSNI’S Major Investigation Team are appealing for information about Lu Na McKinney who died at Devenish Island in Fermanagh on Thursday 13 April 2017.Last week her husband Stephen McKinney – who had been arrested in Derry seven days earlier – appeared in court and was formally charged with the murder of the 35 -year-old mother of two.Detective Inspector David McGrory said: “Police are issuing a photograph of Mrs McKinney today in the hope that people will come forward with any information they have about her. “I would like to hear from anyone who knew her or anyone who had contact with Mrs McKinney, who lived in Convoy, County Donegal, in the months preceding her death. “Colleagues in An Garda Siochana are working jointly with PSNI to investigate Lu Na’s death and anyone with information can contact either the PSNI on 101 ext 43373, confidential Crimestoppers number on 0800 555 111 or AGS at Letterkenny on 00353 749167100 or the AGS Confidential line on 1800 666 111.” Her husband was charged with murder after police carried out a review into the circumstances surrounding the death of Lu Na McKinney.As a result, as a result have arrested and subsequently charged her 41 year old husband man on suspicion of murder. DerryDEVONISH ISLANDDI DAVID MCCRORYDONEGAL PSNILU NA MCKINNEYPOLICE APPEAL FOR INFORMATION OVER MURDER OF DONEGAL WOMAN LU NA MCKINNEYstrabanelast_img read more

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Despite reduction in twin stillbirth rates there is no change in still

first_img Source:https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/latest/2018/11/Expert-warns-over-‘little-room-for-complacency’-over-fall-in-twin-stillbirth-rates.aspx Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 30 2018A leading expert in fetal medicine at the University of Birmingham has warned that there is ‘little room for complacency’ over a fall in twin stillbirth rates as the reason for this phenomenon are complex.In a paper published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Mark Kilby, Professor of Fetal Medicine at the University of Birmingham’s Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research and Honorary Consultant in Fetal Medicine at Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, with collaborators explore the reasons as to why there has been a nearly 50 per cent fall in twin stillbirth rates from 11 to six per thousand total births between 2013 and 2016.These figures were the findings of Mothers and Babies: Reducing Risk through Audits and Confidential Enquiries across the UK (MBRRACE-UK)’s perinatal surveillance report published in June 2018. The MBRACCE-UK report noted that, although there had been a significant reduction in stillbirth rate in twins, there had been no change in still birth rates in pregnancies involving a single fetus.Approximately one in 60 pregnancies are twins; an incidence increasing in the UK because of the use of artificial reproductive techniques and a rising maternal age.Professor Kilby believes the fall in stillbirths in twins is, in part, due to an increasing recognition by healthcare professionals of the increased fetal risks in “identical twins”.Identical twins either share a single placenta with a single outer membrane and two inner membranes (monochorionic diamniotic twins), or share both the inner and outer membranes (monochorionic monoamniotic twins). These twins are at higher risk due to complications such as twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), twin anaemia polycythaemia sequence (TAPS) and selective fetal growth restriction (sGR).This recognition of the higher risks has led to the introduction of several clinical guidelines including The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists’ Green Top Guideline on the Management of Monochorionic Twins and the generic NICE Guidelines on the Management of Twin and Triplet Pregnancy (currently under revision and to be republished in 2019).Related StoriesResearch team receives federal grant to study obesity in children with spina bifidaRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenA survey by the charity Twins and Multiple Births Association (Tamba) of 29 obstetric units has shown that hospitals following NICE guidance for management of twins have associated lower twin stillbirth, neonatal death rates and admissions to special care baby units. However, the data from Tamba through its Maternity Engagement Programme, indicates that “there is still considerable variation in implementation by NHS healthcare providers across the UK”.Professor Kilby said: “The UK has been innovative in recommending the establishment of twin multidisciplinary teams and clinics along with several national clinical guidelines to aid the management of twin and triplet pregnancies and high risk identical twin pregnancies.”However, adequate resourcing and professional engagement is required to prevent the current considerable variation in implementation of guidelines by NHS healthcare providers across the UK.”Professor Kilby also states that refinements in in-utero treatments, along with new guidelines over the last 15 years on the monitoring of both identical and non-identical twins using ultrasound has also undoubtedly led to increased and earlier detection of complications .Professor Kilby concluded: “The fall in twin stillbirth rates from 11 to six per thousand total births between 2013 and 2016 is welcome news, however, there is little room for complacency and more comprehensive uptake of clinical guidelines and close working with stakeholders such as Tamba and the Multiple Births Foundation will hopefully continue this trend into the future.”He estimated that it would take a minimum of two years for hospital trusts in the NHS to engage with the recommendations by establishing multidisciplinary teams, a multiple pregnancy service and an infrastructure to deliver care and urged that much more work still needed to be done.Keith Reed, CEO of Tamba, said: “Hundreds of babies lives could be saved and potentially thousands prevented going into neonatal care, but progress is at risk because funding for TAMBA’s successful Maternity Engagement Programme is due to end on March 2019 and there are another 124 obstetric units in England to engage with.”last_img read more

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OU Health Sciences Center awarded federal grant to enhance dementia care across

first_imgDementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, is much more prevalent in older adults. As the number of older Oklahomans increases, this disease will become more common. We don’t want people with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers to become isolated. We want communities and healthcare systems that are friendly to people with cognitive impairment and memory loss. We want people to thrive as long as they can, as best they can, with the support that they need.”Lee Jennings, M.D., OU College of Medicine Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 3 2019The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, working with partners across the state, has been awarded a $3.75 million federal grant to enhance the care and support of a growing group of Oklahomans – those who suffer from memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia.According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 65,000 Oklahomans currently live with Alzheimer’s, and that number is expected to grow. An especially cruel disease with heartbreaking cognitive decline and no cure, Alzheimer’s requires a circle of support so that people with the disease can live as well as possible for as long as possible.The program established by the grant will focus on two overarching objectives: educating the current and future workforce to better care for people with dementia, and creating dementia-friendly health systems. Unfortunately, Oklahoma ranks near the bottom in several quality of life and health rankings for older adults. Lee Jennings, M.D., a geriatrician with the OU College of Medicine who is leading the grant, said she hopes the upcoming efforts will improve those numbers. The structure of the program is uniquely opposite of most academic grants. Rather than working solely with physicians and students on campus, the program will engage primary care clinics around the state, direct-care providers such as nursing home staff, organizations like the Alzheimer’s Association, and family members and caregivers of people with dementia.Most of the medical care for patients with dementia is provided by primary care clinics, but that only accounts for a short medical visit. That means families and other caregivers are taking care of loved ones the majority of the time. And because Oklahoma is largely a rural state with not enough primary care physicians, the need is great to increase support and knowledge for everyone helping a person with dementia.Hudson OU College of Public Health department chair Thomas Teasdale, who holds a doctorate in public health, is co-leading the program with Jennings. Through an existing partnership with the Oklahoma State Department of Health, Teasdale already works with the state’s 300-plus nursing homes, where 70 percent of residents live with some type of dementia. The grant also will allow him to enhance dementia care education for new audiences, including community health workers, in partnership with the Oklahoma City-County Health Department. Another partner agency, the Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality, will provide quality improvement consulting as the program evolves.Related StoriesDementia patients hospitalized and involved in transitional care at higher ratesA program of therapy and coping strategies works long-term for family dementia carersUse of statins linked to reduction of mortality risk in dementia patientsJennings and her team also will work with OKPRN, the Oklahoma Practice-Based Research/Resource Network, a large group of physicians who conduct ongoing research to improve the care they provide. In addition, the grant will allow OU dementia specialists to provide tele-consultations for rural physicians who might need help treating patients with complications.”We want to offer rural providers the expertise in our university setting. They may need new strategies for managing a patient’s neuropsychiatric symptoms or treating difficult diagnoses related to dementia,” Jennings said.The grant’s second objective — to create dementia-friendly health systems – covers everything from the physical layout of a clinic to the community resources that are available for people and their caregivers. Clinics can improve their environments by ensuring signs are understandable, exam tables are easy to use for older adults, and sensory aids like hearing amplifiers and large-print materials are available.A dementia-friendly practice also means both clinical providers and staff can connect patients and families with community resources where they live. Support groups, for both caregivers and the person living with dementia, are often crucial in helping people cope. They also can help reduce the stigma that is still associated with the disease.”We want to let people know that there are resources, and we don’t want caregivers to feel stigmatized,” Jennings said. “It can be isolating if caregivers don’t feel like they can go out into the community with their loved one. We want to help people live with dignity and be as independent as possible while they age with this disease.”The effort also extends to Oklahoma’s Native American tribes. The Choctaw Nation in particular is working not only within its own geriatric clinics, but beyond the healthcare setting to transportation access for people with dementia.”This grant and program would not be possible without our many community partners,” Jennings said. “We are putting these federal dollars to use in our communities throughout Oklahoma to improve the health and quality of life of people with memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia.”This federal grant was awarded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under the award number 1 U1QHP330820100. Source:University of Oklahomalast_img read more

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AP CM lays foundation stone for Machilipatnam port works

first_imgSHARE Published on Andhra Pradesh February 07, 2019 COMMENT Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naiducenter_img The deep water port at Machilipatnam in Krishna district which will be completed in the next few years will lead to all-round development of the region and the State, according to Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N. Chandrababu Naidu.He was speaking near the port town, Machilipatnam, the headquarters of Krishna district, on Thursday afternoon, after unveiling a plaque to mark the inauguration of the works on the deep water port.He said the Navayuga Engineering Company, taking up the port work, was also taking part in the construction of the mega Polavaram irrigation project on the Godavari in West Godavari district. “The company has set up a world record in executing Polavaram project and I am sure the works on the port will also be completed with the same speed. A deep water port at Machilipatnam is the dream of the people of this region and at last it is coming true, after crossing many hurdles. This is a historic occasion,” he said.The port would not only serve the interests of Andhra Pradesh, being the nearest port to the capital city of Amaravati, but the States of Telangana, Karnataka and Maharashtra are only in its hinterland, he said, adding that he would take personal interest in speeding up the works. The port will be constructed on 4,800 acres of land, including an industrial park, and it is estimated that the port and park would lead to 80,000 direct and indirect employment. ports SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTSlast_img read more

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